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Supreme Court on defects of Prevention of Money Laundering A

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Court :
SUPREME COURT OF INDIA

Brief :
Supreme Court on defects of Prevention of Money Laundering Act, 2002 and proposed/amended provisions The provisions of the Act in question are so provided that there may not be independent judiciary to decide the cases under the Act but the Members and the Chairperson to be selected by the Selection Committee headed by Revenue Secretary; freedom from control and potential domination of the executive are necessary pre-conditions for the independence and impartiality of judges

Citation :
Pareena Swarup v. Union of India WP (Civil) No. 634 of 2007 September 30, 2008

RELEVANT EXTRACTS : ** ** ** ** ** ** 8) It is necessary that the Court may draw a line which the executive may not cross in their misguided desire to take over bit by bit and judicial functions and powers of the State exercised by the duly constituted Courts. While creating new avenue of judicial forums, it is the duty of the Government to see that they are not in breach of basic constitutional scheme of separation of powers and independence of the judicial function. We agree with the apprehension of the petitioner that the provisions of Prevention of the Money Laundering Act are so provided that there may not be independent judiciary to decide the cases under the Act but the Members and the Chairperson to be selected by the Selection Committee headed by Revenue Secretary. It is to be noted that this Court in the case of L. Chandra Kumar vs. Union of India and Ors., (1997) 3 SCC 261 has laid down that power of judicial review over legislative action vested in the High Courts under Article 226 as well as in this Court under Article 32 of the Constitution is an integral and essential feature of the Constitution constituting part of the its structure. The Constitution guarantees free and independent judiciary and the constitutional scheme of separation of powers can be easily and seriously undermined, if the legislatures were to divest the regular courts of their jurisdiction in all matters, entrust the same to the newly created Tribunals which are not entitled to protection similar to the constitutional protection afforded to the regular Courts. The independence and impartiality which are to be secured not only for the Court but also for Tribunals and their members, though they do not belong to the `Judicial Service' are entrusted with judicial powers. The safeguards which ensure independence and impartiality are not for promoting personal prestige of the functionary but for preserving and protecting the rights of the citizens and other persons who are subject to the jurisdiction of the Tribunal and for ensuring that such Tribunal will be able to command the confidence of the public. Freedom from control and potential domination of the executive are necessary pre-conditions for the independence and impartiality of judges. To make it clear that a judiciary free from control by the Executive and Legislature is essential if there is a right to have claims decided by Judges who are free from potential domination by other branches of Government. With this background, let us consider the defects pointed out by the petitioner and amended/proposed provisions of the Act and the Rules. 9) Mr. Gopal Subramaniam has informed this Court that the suggested actions have been completed by amending the Rules. Even other wise, according to him, the proposed suggestions formulated by Mr. K.K. Venugopal would be incorporated on disposal of the above writ petition. For convenience, let us refer the doubts raised by the petitioner and amended/proposed provisions as well as the remarks of the department in complying with the same. 10) Inasmuch as the amended/proposed provisions, as mentioned in para 9, are in tune with the scheme of the Constitution as well as the principles laid down by this Court, we approve the same and direct the respondent-Union of India to implement the above provisions, if not so far amended as suggested, as expeditiously as possible but not later than six months from the date of receipt of copy of this judgment. The writ petition is disposed of accordingly. No costs. This Court records its appreciation for the valuable assistance rendered by Mr. K.K. Venugopal, learned senior counsel and Mr. Gopal Subramaniam, learned Addl. Solicitor General. ** ** ** ** ** **
 

CHEZHIYAN
on 24 October 2008
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